Igor Kheifets Interview

Igor Kheifets talks about his life growing up and how he got into internet marketing.

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Editor:

This time, we are talking with Igor Kheifets, who has been totally crushing it recently as an affiliate marketer, an online course creator, an author and speaker. He’s the guy behind the claim product such as Elite Traffic Pro and the 301K Challenge. So, Igor, it’s a real pleasure to meet you.

Igor Kheifets:

It’s great to be here. I’m excited to share and excited to drop a few nuggets and see if we can help you guys listening make some more money, have more fun doing it as well.

Editor:

Sounds good. Now let’s start by finding out more about you and your background, if that’s okay.

Igor Kheifets:

Yeah. I’m originally Ukrainian. I was born in Ukraine. Both my parents are Russian. My dad was stationed in Ukraine because he was an officer in the Soviet Army. He graduated the Suvorov Military Academy in Moscow. And me and my brother were born in Ukraine. And by the time I was born, my dad decided that he didn’t want to stay in the army because the wall came down. It was just coming down. It was 1988, and he went into business for himself. So I grew up watching my dad doing all kinds of entrepreneurial things. And then around when I was about 12 or so, just before my bar mitzvah, as you can tell I’m Jewish, my family decided to move to Israel, and this is where we entered this really, really, really, really rough patch that lasted about 10 years or so.

Now, I guess you can also say that the rough patch started in Ukraine because that was the reason we moved. We ended up selling all of our possessions. We were really living pretty well. I’d say we were considered to be upper middle class back then. We had a car. We had an apartment. We had food on the table. So we didn’t struggle. But towards the move, yeah, we started struggling. And I think the reason we moved was because of that. My dad made a bad investment. He borrowed about 10,000 US dollars, which at the time was crazy ridiculous amount of money from a local mobster, Nikolai Makarenko, and obviously a guy you don’t want to mess with. And he invested in something called [inaudible 00:02:10], which is kind of like a farm. It used to be a state-owned farm, but then they got privatised after the wall came down, and it was just a wild, wild west.

So my dad and a few other people invested together, and the [inaudible 00:02:24] CEO at one point decided not to do anything for the [inaudible 00:02:29]. He decided to drink and have fun, and he spent the money. So when my dad realised that he just sold our possessions, and I think he had 1000 US dollars left to his name, and then we just moved to Israel once we paid off the debt. And that sparked one of the most difficult eras of my life, and I guess in life of my family members because we quickly sank into debt. My dad went to see a doctor, discovered he had diabetes, then he went into a double bypass, and he couldn’t find work.

The few occasions were when he could find work usually was some sort of security guard job, which obviously didn’t pay anything. But to make it worse, the security company would usually hire him, keep him for about eight months, and then fire him for three months to only rehire him again after a three months period because that was their way to leverage the loophole where if they didn’t employ him for nine month straight, they didn’t have to give him seniority, and of course, raise his paycheck, give him benefits and so on.

And growing up, my dad remembered that when he was a part of the Soviet Army, life was good. So he told me that I should do the same. And so in Israel, everyone has to do mandatory army service. So my parents enrolled me into a Israeli Air Force Academy when I was about 14. And I spent the next six years being trained as a soldier and going to school all the same time. I was wearing the uniform. I had my beret always sitting on my left shoulder. I was a proper little soldier. And then, I enrolled into the actual military, did my bootcamp, and started serving my time. And I say serving my time as if it’s prison because it kind of felt like prison. I realised quickly that it wasn’t the life I wanted because the guys who graduated before me, couple years before me, they were already serving for a few years, and they were still frustrated and broken.

I mean, it was just… They seemed like a bunch of miserable dudes. That’s the impression I’ve got. So I decided I didn’t want to do that, and I quickly found loopholes to get out of the army. I kind of broke that bureaucratic machine, which is when I learned quite a few lessons, to be honest with you, trying to game the system. And so once I got out, I got involved in network marketing as a result of reading Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad Poor Dad because in the book he says, “Look, you should do real estate, but you should also go in business for yourself. And if you don’t have any business ideas or money or sense or whatever, just go into MLM. And becoming a network marketer, you learn lots of great skills, including a skill of actually selling,” which I did. But I went into an online market in the… I went into network marketing in the online space.

So I seek out these network marketing companies that were internet-friendly, if you will. And as a result, I got involved and exposed, I guess, in the world of digital marketing, social media marketing, blogging, running ads. At the time when I started, MySpace was still around. It was still a thing. So you could build MySpace profiles, promoting your business. I think I had five or something. And I just kind of built that skill set of a digital marketer. I quickly understood what WordPress was, and I started building WordPress websites. I became skilled, but I wasn’t making any money. And it was through that I got exposed to affiliate marketing, which made a lot more sense to me than network marketing because it had that commission element where I didn’t have to create the product myself, and I could make money, but there was no human motivation required. I didn’t have to build a team and keep them motivated to continue to do the work, and I didn’t have to do any kind of three-way meetings or go to hotel lobbies and pretend I’m having fun.

And so that’s where I’ve experienced my first success. It was when I combined affiliate marketing with building my own email list, which at the time I came to realise is probably the only one thing that is common for anyone who was successful making money on the internet. They all had email lists, and it’s like the bigger the list they had, the more money they were making. And when I realised that, I kind of put all my effort into building my list. I really just did everything. I tried every technique to do it, but everything I’ve done was eventually leading to an opt-in form or a capture page that was asking people for an email address and was after I built my first list of I believe at the time was about 1700 people or 2000 people that I started mailing offers.

I remember one day, I had this little thing that I’ve done on the side where I would drive people to the airport to make some extra money using my dad’s car. And I came back from one of these trips, and I think I must have been stuck in traffic for at least three hours on a six-hour drive. It was terrible. I came back. My back was hurting like hell. And I just sat down. I realised didn’t write my email for the day because I was really trying to stick to that daily email routine. And that day, it was a new product launching. It was, I think, 70 bucks or 67 bucks, and it paid a 50% commission. And there were also a few upsells that paid, I think, 40% commission as well. And I just sat down and I wrote an email. It was a really heartfelt email. I didn’t really write a marketing email. I just shared my thoughts like it was my diary.

And in that email, I really spoke about my back pain. Even though I was only 20 something years old, I was already experiencing really, really painful lower back pain. And I just kind of wrote that and then I linked to the product. And that was, again, a very personable email, kind of exposing myself being a little bit vulnerable. And that night, I woke up the next morning to discover that overnight I’ve made 17 sales with one email, and it was like, “Jackpot, baby.” I slept and I woke up with an extra, I believe it was, what, 307… About $500 or so. There were a few upsells too. But I woke up and having made that night more money than I was making in a few days of actual manual labour and hard work.

At the time, I was in housekeeping. I was working in a hotel housekeeping. So I was just scrubbing hotel rooms and all sorts of territories and toilets. That was it. I mean, that was my proof of concept. That was everything that I needed to double down. I thought I was already working pretty hard, but that was the moment I doubled down. I just really devoted myself to this skill of generating people into my email list and mailing them with offers. That’s really been my focus for years and years and years. And I think I owe almost every single dollar I’ve ever made online to these two skills.

Editor:

So when that happened, what did you do? Was it a case of, “Okay, I now just need to stop doing everything else and just focus on my email list?”

Igor Kheifets:

It was that. Yeah. As soon as I saw a big result, a big outcome from a relatively small action, which is writing and sending an email, I immediately started doing more of that, writing more heartfelt emails, more story based emails, more emails that spoke to personal qualities, to concerns and problems and issues. It was my accidental discovery that the more emotion I could inject into my emails, the more money I would eventually make. And another discovery I made shortly after is the more I emailed, the more I made. And one thing that I’ve done back then better I think than many people who had email lists probably much bigger than mine is I wasn’t afraid to mail it my list. And these days when I teach people to email their lists and to build lists, one of the most common things that I see is people actually building a list, spending money, time, effort, energy, to build a list and not mail the list. They’re afraid to do it. They don’t know what to say, but they just let thousands of people just sit there and forget about them.

Editor:

Oh, this is the thing. I think that they can be an element of fear in people’s minds, which is, “I’m going to annoy these people if I’m emailing them every day.” Did you ever have that mindset, or were you just like, “No, I need to get out there and just email people on a regular basis?”

Igor Kheifets:

I think I was just being very intuitive with what I was doing. I didn’t have a plan. As soon as I got this gratification coming when I refreshed my commission screen and just, oh, commission bar grew significantly, I just kind of tried to ask myself, “Well, what did I do that preceded that, and can I do more of that on purpose?” And it’s funny because I kind of do that all the time even today where I would have an accidental success, could be a small success, could be a medium sized success, and then I would ask myself, “Interesting. Can I make it happen again?” And I would try and go back and reverse engineer it because I’ve never been a creative person. I’ve never been the kind of guy who can come up with creative solutions. For example, my best friend Dennis, he’s like that. He’s almost a genius. I say almost because I don’t want him to get too…

Editor:

Too big-headed. Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

Too big-headed. We don’t want that. But he’s almost a genius because these days if we have a problem, I actually call him up and I say, “This is the problem, and I just shut up. And he kind of thinks for a few minutes and he kind of spits out a solution, or maybe I’ll call him up and I’ll say, “Can this happen? Is this possible? Can we make this happen?” And he tell me, “Yeah, let me think about it.” And then two days later, he comes back, and here we go. But I was never like that. I’m the kind of guy who actually doesn’t like to think of creative solutions, rather, I would much rather be told what to do and just double down and go do it like a mechanic almost.

And I guess my army education is to blame for that because in the army, they don’t really teach you to think. They just want you to execute. And I was very good at that. I was always great at executing. So I can sit behind my computer for 16 hours straight and be super devoted to achieving this one goal or one mission. I can be like that. I can be very focused, but I can’t be creative. So when something happens because I accidentally, without thinking about it or without being strategic about it, did something, I go back. I go back just because I recognise I’m not creative, and I want to try and understand what happened there. How did I accidentally hit oil or something. So yeah, that’s definitely been a skill that helped me out with email marketing. Because remember at that time… I mean, these days, there’s so many people talking about email marketing. There’s so many experts. There’s so many knowledgeable folks.

But back when I started, were talking about 12 years ago, 10 years ago when I was really into it, there wasn’t much education about it, and the people who were doing the educating, they were guessing half the time. They didn’t have the data to back up what they were teaching. They were just saying, “Hey, I did something and it worked, and here’s what I did. Here’s a case study.” Or they were trying to give you rules that weren’t really effective, didn’t really apply to you. How many times did I hear, “Oh, you should email your list once a week,” when that was actually the wrong way to go about it, or how many times did you hear, “Oh, you should only email your list… You should only email anyone who gets on your list for seven days, and they don’t buy anything. That’s it. They’re never going to buy.” That’s also not true.

I’ve got people on my list who buy after six months, eight months. I had one guy one time email me. He’s like, “Igor, I’ve been on your list for four years, and this last email you sent finally got me.” We’ve got a tonne of people who always say something like, “I’ve been following Igor for 10 years, eight years, five years, and I finally decided to pull the trigger when they talk to my team.” And it’s super common. It’s super common. So the whole idea of mailing your list once a week or to giving up on your leads after a week of mailing them, there’s not true.

Editor:

Yeah. I mean, you mentioned before you say that you’re not that creative, but you have written books.

Igor Kheifets:

Yes, I have written books, and I’ve written them without being creative. Believe it or not. I also write lots of ad copy and sales copy. I come up with lots of ads and lots of angles for my promotions, but those aren’t creative either. For example, my most recent ad about E-Farming has already generated close to 1.5 million views on YouTube. And that ad is really hitting well. If you’re browsing YouTube, you might see it soon if you haven’t seen it before, especially if you’re interested in the topic of making money online or making money in general, running the business, et cetera. But, everything that I do, I try to be as least creative about it as possible because I know that creativity requires lots of brain power and lots of time. My least favourite thing to do is to get in front of a blank sheet of paper where I have to write a headline or an email subject line.

I would usually much rather either model something that works, or I come up with formulas and templates, and I use those. The way I got introduced to the whole concept of copywriting which is salesmanship and print was through a book by Dan Kennedy called The Ultimate Sales Letter. And I think it’s a great book not because it teaches great copywriting techniques. No, I don’t think that’s the greatest book for that. I think there’s quite a few books out there who teach you much better copywriting techniques, and they’re great at teaching, they’re great at inspiring you and so on and so forth. But the one thing The Ultimate Sales Letter did for me, which completely changed my life because it allowed me to really buy into the idea that I don’t have to be creative to come up with million dollar sales copy, is that copy is templates. Copy is building blocks.

So in other words, the way you write a headline, right, there’s probably 20 or 40 different formulas for a headline. The one of the most familiar ones you’ve probably seen before is how to blank, right, how to benefit or about how to benefit without the thing that you hate, where you just have to replace the thing that you hate with whatever. So let’s write three headlines right now and let’s write them for three different markets. How about the skin care market? So how to have fewer wrinkles without plastic surgery. Bam, that’s a headline. Let’s write one for weight loss. How to lose five pounds in two weeks without giving up chocolate. There you go. That’s a headline. Let’s write one for a business owner who is struggling to hire a superstar VA, right? So how to get more time and more freedom in your life and your business without having to pay six figure salary to a Harvard grad level VA or something like that.

So you can come up with this stuff on the fly if you know the formulas, and there’s formulas like that for everything. So, The Ultimate Sales Letter, what it did for me, it basically took this whole concept over a long form, 24-page sales letter that we all received in the mail at one point or another, or maybe you want to imagine just a website sales page where it’s really long. You have to scroll through it for three hours and broke it down. It’s like, “Okay, this is a headline. This is an opener. This is bullet point section. This is the guarantee. This is the close. This is sales argument number one, sales argument number two. This is the PAS. This is the takeaway selling. This is the value build. This is the stack.” And all of a sudden, you look at this stuff, and it’s like you’ve got X-ray vision now because you’re like, “Oh, I see what’s going on here. It’s really not that difficult.”

And the same concept can be applied to almost any area of your life because it is typical that whoever is proficient or effective at some niche expertise or thing, they appear creative. But if you start studying them and you watch them do something one after another, one after another, you’ll be able to break down the commonalities of what they do. I’ll give you a great example. One of my best buddies back in Israel, name is Stas and he runs a deli. And he sells all kinds of groceries and stuff, but I’ve helped him start a YouTube channel and do some video ads on Facebook as well, which helped him grow his store to be about double the size of his largest competitor within three years, and I’m not making this up, to a point where his biggest competitor actually went ahead and threatened the suppliers because the suppliers for this town are all the same. They all come in and supply all the stores. Threatening the suppliers that if they sell to my friend, he’ll stop buying from them.

And my friend gets so big that they said, “You know what? If you’re going to do that, we respect it, but we can’t stop selling to him.” So that was really cool. So my buddy Stas is extremely creative, extremely. He approaches everything with great creativity. But I noticed something. I was watching him cook a lot because together we were recording these videos where he would be doing barbecue and all kinds of ribs and steaks and stuff like that for the ads because he would record an ad making a steak, and then he would invite people to his store saying, “Hey, we got the best meat for this stuff. See this lean cut? You can come in and buy this, and I’ll prep this for you.” So it was very convenient, right? So it’s kind of like you watch it. You see him make it, and then it’s like, “Oh, I need these ingredients, and I only have the tutorials, so I’ll just go and buy it from him.”

Editor:

Yup, yup.

Igor Kheifets:

So he became a bit of a celebrity after doing that. So I was the one originally helping him film. We just had a DSLR camera, or sometimes I would use my phone, and I would film everything. He would be doing it and talking about it as he does it. So after doing about five of these in a row where he did poultry, beef, a steak of some kind, some lamb and a bunch of other stuff, it always appeared amazing and creative, right? However, I spotted a few commonalities. First thing, the oils he’s using, the spices he’s using, he would always put sugar on the meat always, and if he doesn’t put it straight on the meat, he would put in the sauce. So whenever he would smear the sauce all over the meat, it would be sweet, which naturally made it tastier to people.

He would have his rules about the temperature and the time that you need to hold the meat. So to an untrained eye, it appeared it was like [inaudible 00:22:47] magic, right, but you spend enough time with him in the kitchen and you’re like, “Oh, I see what’s going on.” And then you can apply the same rules. So if it’s a sauce, it has to have sugar in it. If it’s spices, these are the top three to use. If it’s fish, then you got to do this and remove this part from the fish, et cetera. You spend enough time with him and you realise there’s actual rules. It’s just he never put them in a book, right? That’s the only difference.

He can’t articulate how he does it, but he quickly comes up with a set of rules for everything that he does. And I’ve also seen him do the same with learning video editing, because I would help him film the videos, but I would not be doing the editing. I don’t like to do that. But he got on YouTube, he watched a few tutorials, and all of a sudden he’s doing the editing. Now why is that? How is that possible? Well, all he had to do is just figure out, “Okay, here’s the basic things, the five things you need to do to make the video good. One, work on the colour gamma inside the software. So modify the colours. Two, cut out all the [inaudible 00:23:54] and all the empty space, all the silence. Great. Add a transition. Awesome. Add subtitles. Great. And add some background music. There you go. There’s your video.

And see, that’s five rules that can be applied to virtually any video. So almost anything that I do, I usually try to break it down into a system, and it allows me to get into things that I know nothing about and actually do it pretty successfully. For example, I’ve got a daughter, she’s 10, and I am really sensitive about her self-esteem. Like when she grows up, I want to ensure that her self-esteem is bulletproof because there’s going to be plenty of people in life that are going to try to put her down. It happened to me many times. And I regret spending my teen teenage years in Israel really allowing bullies to take over my self-image and really believed that I wasn’t worthy, that I was basically beneath them, so to speak.

Of course, aim the case right now. They’re looking at my Facebook post driving my Porsche Panamera GTS. And they’re messaging me, asking me to teach them how to do it. But of course, I just ignore them. I still hold the grudge, but I’m kind of like that. But I guess what I’m saying is one thing that I heard in a book is that it’s easier for us, and I’m sure that it’s actually true, otherwise, it wouldn’t actually follow through on it. But it’s easier for us to imagine ourselves in a story and take on ideas through a story rather than someone telling us. So it doesn’t matter how many times I can tell to my daughter she’s amazing, she’s great, and that I’m proud of her, et cetera. What I felt would be really cool is if she could see herself as a superhero in a story. Because growing up, I used to be and still am really inspired by superhero stories.

I’m a huge Marvel fan, huge Batman fan. And anytime I would watch something like Ironman or Batman, I would always try to imagine myself as them overcoming this big obstacle or finding this crazy smart enemy. But my daughter didn’t resonate. Apparently, she needed a female character. And so when Captain Marvel came out with the proper first super power female character besides Wonder Woman, which came out later, she really went into that. She really liked the movie. And I had an idea. It’s like interesting, what if I actually create a comic book where she’s the hero like actual my daughter, Erica is the hero. And I ended up doing that. I brought in an artist and I brought in like a story script writer. I gave them an outline of what I wanted that to look like. The writer did the writing. I took that to the artist.

The artist broke it into sections and screens. And within about six months or so and after spending I think about $3,000 total, I’ve had the first edition of Erica and the Birds, where she’s saving the town and the planet. Well, the town actually, not the planet, but where three guys basically steal all the birds. They come up with this device that attracts all the birds. So they put them all into one giant cage. But all of a sudden you’ve got no one to spread the seeds, and it’s like it’s a big problem. So they call on Erica to save the day, and she uses her super hearing to find the bad guys in the woods and kick some ass. So, I like the process so much that I kind of boiled down the template for the process.

So it starts with an outline, then it needs to turn into a story with dialogue. Then we move it to an artist who breaks it into section, and then he just gets the sections done. And then I just take that to a print house and they print it that I did two more comic books within the next six months. So the following two comic books were produced much faster and cheaper than the first one because I was able to get the system down. So this systematic thinking, I try to apply it to pretty much anything, and it really helps me out, including by the way, my marriage, which is where I’ve been applying it more recently where I’ve been paying attention to what I say or what I do and how it makes my wife feel and vice versa. I’ve been trying to spot what she does that makes me feel a certain way and trying to eliminate the bad stuff and encourage the good stuff.

And that’s been working really well. I really feel like for many years, my marriage satisfaction levels were pretty low because I would just invest most of my time into my business. Just like any entrepreneur, I guess, we tend to work 80 hours a week and stuff, right?

But recently, I’ve been really paying attention to that because several of my friends in the industry got divorced, and that was kind of unexpected. And you see them do crazy things like going to Thailand and taking three years off and stuff like that. I don’t want to go through that to be honest with you. I like my wife. I like my marriage. I like my family life.

So I was thinking, “Okay, what do I need to do with that?” And so I started spotting what are the things that I do accidentally that make her go like, “Aw, you really love me,” and what are the things she does accidentally that make me go, “Oh, I really love that.” And so as a result, the satisfaction levels in the marriage, at least for me… I don’t know about her, I didn’t ask her. But at least for me went up significantly because I became more conscious about the accidental stuff that happened, and now I can make it happen on purpose. And I didn’t know that. I used to give my wife flowers. I know she loves flowers, but I approached her like an entrepreneur, and I just had my assistant order them every two weeks and send them over to my house.

Editor:

Nice. Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

And the first time was nice. The second time was okay, but the third time my wife didn’t even bat an eye. It wasn’t so much as a thank you. And I was like, “What’s up?” And she says, “Well, you didn’t do it.” I said, “No, I did. It’s just I wasn’t the one dialling the store, but I paid for it, and I organised the system for it.” She said, “Yeah, but you didn’t actually physically go and got them for me.”

Editor:

Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

And first I argued with her, but then after a few hours, I sort of accepted it. And one time, I remember going to get some milk in the grocery store and seeing flowers at the counter and literally just grabbed the first one, the nearest buy to me. Just grabbed the bouquet and bring it home and my wife was really, really, really excited about it.

So now, I would make a point every couple of weeks to go to the grocery store, which I usually don’t go to. My wife does that, and our housekeeper does that sometimes. So I would go there even if I have no reason to go just to take the flowers so I could make my wife happy. Again, why? Because it happened accidentally, but I had enough awareness to say, “Oh, look at that. This is interesting.” Maybe I can make it happen on purpose. And so now I don’t have to wonder about how to make my wife smile. I have the exact system to make it happen. And somebody may say I’m creative or whatever, but a lot of it comes down to just observation.

I really think people go through life these days. They’re not observing. That’s why I love to hang out with entrepreneurs because they’re so engaged with what they do. They really pay attention to detail. They’re not like mindlessly trying to go through life. They’re not wandering about. They’re really, really, really focused and engaged. But most people are not. Most people are like drifters if you will. It’s what Napoleon Hill spoke about in his book Outwitting the Devil, which I think is a hundred times a thousand times better than Think and Grow Rich, which is a great book. But Outwitting the Devil, I think should be taught in schools because it’s just amazing. Such a good book.

Editor:

I mean, you’ve achieved so much as well, Igor. And I guess you’re now based in Canada, right? So you moved your family. Was that after the success had started or was that something that you did before kind of really kickstarting your business?

Igor Kheifets:

So I made my first million before I turned 24, 25, and I moved to Canada when I was 29 or 28. So it was definitely after. And it took me a few years to actually pull the trigger because my parents stayed back in Israel. My parents wouldn’t be able to go through another immigration. My dad is just health-wise, he’s not going to be able to pull it off. Plus, learning the language, et cetera, is just too much for them. So I had to make a decision to leave them back home and move my wife and my kids to Canada for the sake of higher quality of life and a brighter future. And it was definitely after I achieved success. And I think I wouldn’t move unless I achieved success because I think what really helped me pull the trigger and what helps me wake up in the morning with some confidence is the fact that I’ve making so much money that most problems… Not all of them, of course. That most problems come my way, I can fix with money.

So coming here, I was pretty confident about being able to settle in, being able to figure out the game. I quickly built a network, and I really got to say I’m pretty sure none of them were listening to this, but I’m really grateful to all the people that I’ve met along the way. Both the service providers who made money off of me as well as people who just helped me pro bono to help me settle here and help me learn the rules of the game, rules of engagement.

It took me about two years to fully settle in and feel comfortable to get my systems dialled in. Again, I bring this thinking to everything I do. So, to get a lawyer, a CPA, know how to file my taxes, figure out my credit score, which was a brand new thing to me because there’s no such thing as a credit score in Israel. So that took a while to figure out. I came in, and I brought in over a million dollars in savings, and they’re like, “No, we’re not going to give you a loan for a Lexus.” “Okay, will you give me one for Toyota?” “No.” “Will you give me one for a Ford?” “No.” “Why is that? I’m rich. I can buy this car in cash.” “Yeah, but your credit score sucks. You don’t have credit history.” It’s like, “Ah, come on.”

Editor:

Would you say your reward after achieving that success was then to move your family to Canada?

Igor Kheifets:

I wouldn’t call it a reward. I don’t think moving my family to Canada was a reward for anything. It’s not like I was holding back. I think the step to move them to Canada was just long-term thinking because as much as I love Israel, it’s not first world country, lots of different issues. Canada is a first world country. It’s a great base to have, a baseline for my kids, for my family, great healthcare, very little crime. Society where I don’t have to be worried about being stabbed on the street over religious beliefs and things like that.

Editor:

Of course.

Igor Kheifets:

A great monetary system. Housing system is pretty good. A lot of people got rich in Canada just because they lived here and had a house. And I met some of these people. They’re driving really nice cars and live in big houses. And I was like, “Wow, these must be really smart, capable people.” And then I meet with them and I realise they’re idiots. I mean, I really don’t have another word for that. They’re just average, normal people with nothing exceptional about them. Simply, they have a regular day job, and they just had a house that really went up in value. So they refinanced or upgraded. There was nothing that they’ve achieved in life that I would consider to be extraordinary.

And it took me a few years to accept that, to really truly accept that oftentimes getting rich is not about you and who you are as a person. It’s more about being in a certain place at a certain time and just capitalising on one or two opportunities that come your way…

Editor:

Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

… because that’s what a lot of people here did. A lot of people got rich here just because they came in when the real estate industry was developing. The mortgage interest rates were really low. Some of my acquaintances here bought houses with no money down.

Editor:

Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

If I could get housing with no money down, I’d be a lot richer today.

Editor:

Yeah.

Igor Kheifets:

I’ll tell you that.

Editor:

If anybody that wants to follow in your footsteps and learn more about you and your success and also your courses, your books and so on, where do they need to go? What’s the website to visit?

Igor Kheifets:

I recommend starting out by reading my book. It’s called the List Building Lifestyle. And you can either get it on Amazon for, I believe, some like 12 or 20 bucks, or I would recommend going to igorsbook.com and allowing me to ship you a free physical copy of my book and just chip in on shipping and handling, so I can do that for you. But, in addition for you chipping out on shipping and handling, I think it’s less than 10 bucks, I will also give you the digital version of the book for free. I will give you the audible version of the book for free. I will also throw in over $3,200 in bonuses, giving you some of my best templates, some courses and even traffic training, so you can actually go and start building your own list if you haven’t started yet.

So I’m putting together this giant ethical bribe because I practise what I preach. And if you buy the book on Amazon, I will not be able to get you on my email list. As simple as that. Amazon will not share the biggest asset by far, which is the email address of the buyer.

So I encourage you to go to igorsbook.com and start this relationship with me, read my book, get introduced into my world, and explore what else we got going on. Because regardless of where you are in life, I’m pretty sure I can leave you off better off than what I found you if you engage with what we got.

Editor:

And there’s a tease. Igor Kheifets, thank you so much for your time. It’s been an absolute pleasure.

Igor Kheifets:

Thank you.

adver

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